pennyfornasa:

Does the “7 Minutes Of Terror” sound like a cheesy horror flick or a theme park ride to you? It’s not. That’s the phrase NASA used to describe the entry, descent and landing (also known as EDL) sequence of the Mars rover, Curiosity. Seven minutes is the time it took for Curiosity to go from the top of the Martian atmosphere to the surface of Mars. It was by far the most complicated and ambitious Mars landing ever attempted.It required a carefully orchestrated set of maneuvers that had to be controlled entirely by computer. Even the slightest error could mean disaster. The spacecraft began to decelerate as it entered the Martian atmosphere and was guided using small rockets, then at approximately 1,000 mph a supersonic parachute was deployed to further slow the descent allowing the heat shield to separate at around 370 mph. Curiosity then separated from its parachute and began its powered descent at 70 mph using retrorockets that slowed the rover and brought it close enough to the surface that it could be lowered to the ground via a sky crane. It was a daring feat of engineering that captivated the world had everyone holding their breath until they heard the words of the mission controller, “Touchdown confirmed. We’re safe on Mars!”Watch the “7 Minutes Of Terror” http://youtu.be/Ki_Af_o9Q9sDownload the full infographic here: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/infographics/infographic.view.php?id=10776Anyone else think the “7 Minutes Of Terror” would make an awesome theme park ride?
pennyfornasa:

Does the “7 Minutes Of Terror” sound like a cheesy horror flick or a theme park ride to you? It’s not. That’s the phrase NASA used to describe the entry, descent and landing (also known as EDL) sequence of the Mars rover, Curiosity. Seven minutes is the time it took for Curiosity to go from the top of the Martian atmosphere to the surface of Mars. It was by far the most complicated and ambitious Mars landing ever attempted.It required a carefully orchestrated set of maneuvers that had to be controlled entirely by computer. Even the slightest error could mean disaster. The spacecraft began to decelerate as it entered the Martian atmosphere and was guided using small rockets, then at approximately 1,000 mph a supersonic parachute was deployed to further slow the descent allowing the heat shield to separate at around 370 mph. Curiosity then separated from its parachute and began its powered descent at 70 mph using retrorockets that slowed the rover and brought it close enough to the surface that it could be lowered to the ground via a sky crane. It was a daring feat of engineering that captivated the world had everyone holding their breath until they heard the words of the mission controller, “Touchdown confirmed. We’re safe on Mars!”Watch the “7 Minutes Of Terror” http://youtu.be/Ki_Af_o9Q9sDownload the full infographic here: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/infographics/infographic.view.php?id=10776Anyone else think the “7 Minutes Of Terror” would make an awesome theme park ride?
pennyfornasa:

Does the “7 Minutes Of Terror” sound like a cheesy horror flick or a theme park ride to you? It’s not. That’s the phrase NASA used to describe the entry, descent and landing (also known as EDL) sequence of the Mars rover, Curiosity. Seven minutes is the time it took for Curiosity to go from the top of the Martian atmosphere to the surface of Mars. It was by far the most complicated and ambitious Mars landing ever attempted.It required a carefully orchestrated set of maneuvers that had to be controlled entirely by computer. Even the slightest error could mean disaster. The spacecraft began to decelerate as it entered the Martian atmosphere and was guided using small rockets, then at approximately 1,000 mph a supersonic parachute was deployed to further slow the descent allowing the heat shield to separate at around 370 mph. Curiosity then separated from its parachute and began its powered descent at 70 mph using retrorockets that slowed the rover and brought it close enough to the surface that it could be lowered to the ground via a sky crane. It was a daring feat of engineering that captivated the world had everyone holding their breath until they heard the words of the mission controller, “Touchdown confirmed. We’re safe on Mars!”Watch the “7 Minutes Of Terror” http://youtu.be/Ki_Af_o9Q9sDownload the full infographic here: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/infographics/infographic.view.php?id=10776Anyone else think the “7 Minutes Of Terror” would make an awesome theme park ride?
pennyfornasa:

Does the “7 Minutes Of Terror” sound like a cheesy horror flick or a theme park ride to you? It’s not. That’s the phrase NASA used to describe the entry, descent and landing (also known as EDL) sequence of the Mars rover, Curiosity. Seven minutes is the time it took for Curiosity to go from the top of the Martian atmosphere to the surface of Mars. It was by far the most complicated and ambitious Mars landing ever attempted.It required a carefully orchestrated set of maneuvers that had to be controlled entirely by computer. Even the slightest error could mean disaster. The spacecraft began to decelerate as it entered the Martian atmosphere and was guided using small rockets, then at approximately 1,000 mph a supersonic parachute was deployed to further slow the descent allowing the heat shield to separate at around 370 mph. Curiosity then separated from its parachute and began its powered descent at 70 mph using retrorockets that slowed the rover and brought it close enough to the surface that it could be lowered to the ground via a sky crane. It was a daring feat of engineering that captivated the world had everyone holding their breath until they heard the words of the mission controller, “Touchdown confirmed. We’re safe on Mars!”Watch the “7 Minutes Of Terror” http://youtu.be/Ki_Af_o9Q9sDownload the full infographic here: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/infographics/infographic.view.php?id=10776Anyone else think the “7 Minutes Of Terror” would make an awesome theme park ride?
pennyfornasa:

Does the “7 Minutes Of Terror” sound like a cheesy horror flick or a theme park ride to you? It’s not. That’s the phrase NASA used to describe the entry, descent and landing (also known as EDL) sequence of the Mars rover, Curiosity. Seven minutes is the time it took for Curiosity to go from the top of the Martian atmosphere to the surface of Mars. It was by far the most complicated and ambitious Mars landing ever attempted.It required a carefully orchestrated set of maneuvers that had to be controlled entirely by computer. Even the slightest error could mean disaster. The spacecraft began to decelerate as it entered the Martian atmosphere and was guided using small rockets, then at approximately 1,000 mph a supersonic parachute was deployed to further slow the descent allowing the heat shield to separate at around 370 mph. Curiosity then separated from its parachute and began its powered descent at 70 mph using retrorockets that slowed the rover and brought it close enough to the surface that it could be lowered to the ground via a sky crane. It was a daring feat of engineering that captivated the world had everyone holding their breath until they heard the words of the mission controller, “Touchdown confirmed. We’re safe on Mars!”Watch the “7 Minutes Of Terror” http://youtu.be/Ki_Af_o9Q9sDownload the full infographic here: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/infographics/infographic.view.php?id=10776Anyone else think the “7 Minutes Of Terror” would make an awesome theme park ride?

pennyfornasa:

Does the “7 Minutes Of Terror” sound like a cheesy horror flick or a theme park ride to you? It’s not. That’s the phrase NASA used to describe the entry, descent and landing (also known as EDL) sequence of the Mars rover, Curiosity. Seven minutes is the time it took for Curiosity to go from the top of the Martian atmosphere to the surface of Mars. It was by far the most complicated and ambitious Mars landing ever attempted.

It required a carefully orchestrated set of maneuvers that had to be controlled entirely by computer. Even the slightest error could mean disaster. The spacecraft began to decelerate as it entered the Martian atmosphere and was guided using small rockets, then at approximately 1,000 mph a supersonic parachute was deployed to further slow the descent allowing the heat shield to separate at around 370 mph. Curiosity then separated from its parachute and began its powered descent at 70 mph using retrorockets that slowed the rover and brought it close enough to the surface that it could be lowered to the ground via a sky crane. It was a daring feat of engineering that captivated the world had everyone holding their breath until they heard the words of the mission controller, “Touchdown confirmed. We’re safe on Mars!”

Watch the “7 Minutes Of Terror” http://youtu.be/Ki_Af_o9Q9s

Download the full infographic here: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/infographics/infographic.view.php?id=10776

Anyone else think the “7 Minutes Of Terror” would make an awesome theme park ride?

ucresearch:

Einstein’s Brain   (…and the neuroscientist who studied it)
Marian Diamond began her graduate work in 1948 and was the first female student in the department of anatomy at UC Berkeley.  The first thing she was asked to do when she got there was sew a cover for a large magnifying machine (?!?!?!?!).

"They didn’t know what to do with me because they weren’t used to having a woman. They thought I was there to get a husband. I was there to learn."

Such challenges were not uncommon. Years later she requested tissue samples of Albert Einstein’s brain from a pathologist in Missouri. He didn’t trust her.

"He wasn’t sure that I was a scientist. This is one thing that you have to face being a woman.  He didn’t think that I should be the one to be looking at Einstein’s brain."

Marian persisted for three years, calling him once every six months, and received four blocks of the physicist’s brain tissue (about the size of a sugar cube).  
Her research found that Einstein had twice as many glial cells as normal males — the discovery caused an international sensation as well as scientific criticism.  
What are glial cells?  Previously, scientists believe that neurons were responsible for thinking and glial cells were support cells in the brain.  Now Researchers believe the glial cells play a critical role in brain development, learning, memory, aging and disease.
Watch her popular course on Human Anatomy → ucresearch:

Einstein’s Brain   (…and the neuroscientist who studied it)
Marian Diamond began her graduate work in 1948 and was the first female student in the department of anatomy at UC Berkeley.  The first thing she was asked to do when she got there was sew a cover for a large magnifying machine (?!?!?!?!).

"They didn’t know what to do with me because they weren’t used to having a woman. They thought I was there to get a husband. I was there to learn."

Such challenges were not uncommon. Years later she requested tissue samples of Albert Einstein’s brain from a pathologist in Missouri. He didn’t trust her.

"He wasn’t sure that I was a scientist. This is one thing that you have to face being a woman.  He didn’t think that I should be the one to be looking at Einstein’s brain."

Marian persisted for three years, calling him once every six months, and received four blocks of the physicist’s brain tissue (about the size of a sugar cube).  
Her research found that Einstein had twice as many glial cells as normal males — the discovery caused an international sensation as well as scientific criticism.  
What are glial cells?  Previously, scientists believe that neurons were responsible for thinking and glial cells were support cells in the brain.  Now Researchers believe the glial cells play a critical role in brain development, learning, memory, aging and disease.
Watch her popular course on Human Anatomy →

ucresearch:

Einstein’s Brain   (…and the neuroscientist who studied it)


Marian Diamond began her graduate work in 1948 and was the first female student in the department of anatomy at UC Berkeley.  The first thing she was asked to do when she got there was sew a cover for a large magnifying machine (?!?!?!?!).

"They didn’t know what to do with me because they weren’t used to having a woman. They thought I was there to get a husband. I was there to learn."

Such challenges were not uncommon. Years later she requested tissue samples of Albert Einstein’s brain from a pathologist in Missouri. He didn’t trust her.

"He wasn’t sure that I was a scientist. This is one thing that you have to face being a woman.  He didn’t think that I should be the one to be looking at Einstein’s brain."

Marian persisted for three years, calling him once every six months, and received four blocks of the physicist’s brain tissue (about the size of a sugar cube).  

Her research found that Einstein had twice as many glial cells as normal males — the discovery caused an international sensation as well as scientific criticism.  

What are glial cells?  Previously, scientists believe that neurons were responsible for thinking and glial cells were support cells in the brain.  Now Researchers believe the glial cells play a critical role in brain development, learning, memory, aging and disease.

Watch her popular course on Human Anatomy

wifigirl2080:

dynastylnoire:

ananicola:

securelyinsecure:

Meet Jedidah Isler
She is the first black woman to earn a PhD in astronomy from Yale University.

As much as she loves astrophysics, Isler is very aware of the barriers that still remain for young women of color going into science. “It’s unfortunately an as-yet-unresolved part of the experience,” she says. She works to lower those barriers, and also to improve the atmosphere for women of color once they become scientists, noting that “they often face unique barriers as a result of their position at the intersection of race and gender, not to mention class, socioeconomic status and potentially a number of other identities.”
While Isler recounts instances of overt racial and gender discrimination that are jaw-dropping, she says more subtle things happen more often. Isler works with the American Astronomical Society’s commission on the status of minorities in astronomy.
She also believes that while things will improve as more women of color enter the sciences, institutions must lead the way toward creating positive environments for diverse student populations. That is why she is active in directly engaging young women of color: for example participating in a career exploration panel on behalf of the Women’s Commission out of the City of Syracuse Mayor’s Office, meeting with high-achieving middle-school girls. She is also on the board of trustees at the Museum of Science and Technology (MOST).
“Whether I like it or not, I’m one of only a few women of color in this position,” she says. “Addressing these larger issues of access to education and career exploration are just as important as the astrophysical work that I do.”

Learn more:
http://news.syr.edu/getting-to-know-astrophysicist-jedidah-isler-74966/
http://www.nature.com/naturejobs/science/articles/10.1038/nj7480-471a
http://www.npr.org/blogs/codeswitch/2013/12/17/251957062/a-graduate-program-works-to-diversify-the-science-world
https://twitter.com/JedidahIslerPhD

!!!!!!

BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOST YES DAMMIT!

Damn this is amazing!
wifigirl2080:

dynastylnoire:

ananicola:

securelyinsecure:

Meet Jedidah Isler
She is the first black woman to earn a PhD in astronomy from Yale University.

As much as she loves astrophysics, Isler is very aware of the barriers that still remain for young women of color going into science. “It’s unfortunately an as-yet-unresolved part of the experience,” she says. She works to lower those barriers, and also to improve the atmosphere for women of color once they become scientists, noting that “they often face unique barriers as a result of their position at the intersection of race and gender, not to mention class, socioeconomic status and potentially a number of other identities.”
While Isler recounts instances of overt racial and gender discrimination that are jaw-dropping, she says more subtle things happen more often. Isler works with the American Astronomical Society’s commission on the status of minorities in astronomy.
She also believes that while things will improve as more women of color enter the sciences, institutions must lead the way toward creating positive environments for diverse student populations. That is why she is active in directly engaging young women of color: for example participating in a career exploration panel on behalf of the Women’s Commission out of the City of Syracuse Mayor’s Office, meeting with high-achieving middle-school girls. She is also on the board of trustees at the Museum of Science and Technology (MOST).
“Whether I like it or not, I’m one of only a few women of color in this position,” she says. “Addressing these larger issues of access to education and career exploration are just as important as the astrophysical work that I do.”

Learn more:
http://news.syr.edu/getting-to-know-astrophysicist-jedidah-isler-74966/
http://www.nature.com/naturejobs/science/articles/10.1038/nj7480-471a
http://www.npr.org/blogs/codeswitch/2013/12/17/251957062/a-graduate-program-works-to-diversify-the-science-world
https://twitter.com/JedidahIslerPhD

!!!!!!

BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOST YES DAMMIT!

Damn this is amazing!
wifigirl2080:

dynastylnoire:

ananicola:

securelyinsecure:

Meet Jedidah Isler
She is the first black woman to earn a PhD in astronomy from Yale University.

As much as she loves astrophysics, Isler is very aware of the barriers that still remain for young women of color going into science. “It’s unfortunately an as-yet-unresolved part of the experience,” she says. She works to lower those barriers, and also to improve the atmosphere for women of color once they become scientists, noting that “they often face unique barriers as a result of their position at the intersection of race and gender, not to mention class, socioeconomic status and potentially a number of other identities.”
While Isler recounts instances of overt racial and gender discrimination that are jaw-dropping, she says more subtle things happen more often. Isler works with the American Astronomical Society’s commission on the status of minorities in astronomy.
She also believes that while things will improve as more women of color enter the sciences, institutions must lead the way toward creating positive environments for diverse student populations. That is why she is active in directly engaging young women of color: for example participating in a career exploration panel on behalf of the Women’s Commission out of the City of Syracuse Mayor’s Office, meeting with high-achieving middle-school girls. She is also on the board of trustees at the Museum of Science and Technology (MOST).
“Whether I like it or not, I’m one of only a few women of color in this position,” she says. “Addressing these larger issues of access to education and career exploration are just as important as the astrophysical work that I do.”

Learn more:
http://news.syr.edu/getting-to-know-astrophysicist-jedidah-isler-74966/
http://www.nature.com/naturejobs/science/articles/10.1038/nj7480-471a
http://www.npr.org/blogs/codeswitch/2013/12/17/251957062/a-graduate-program-works-to-diversify-the-science-world
https://twitter.com/JedidahIslerPhD

!!!!!!

BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOST YES DAMMIT!

Damn this is amazing!
wifigirl2080:

dynastylnoire:

ananicola:

securelyinsecure:

Meet Jedidah Isler
She is the first black woman to earn a PhD in astronomy from Yale University.

As much as she loves astrophysics, Isler is very aware of the barriers that still remain for young women of color going into science. “It’s unfortunately an as-yet-unresolved part of the experience,” she says. She works to lower those barriers, and also to improve the atmosphere for women of color once they become scientists, noting that “they often face unique barriers as a result of their position at the intersection of race and gender, not to mention class, socioeconomic status and potentially a number of other identities.”
While Isler recounts instances of overt racial and gender discrimination that are jaw-dropping, she says more subtle things happen more often. Isler works with the American Astronomical Society’s commission on the status of minorities in astronomy.
She also believes that while things will improve as more women of color enter the sciences, institutions must lead the way toward creating positive environments for diverse student populations. That is why she is active in directly engaging young women of color: for example participating in a career exploration panel on behalf of the Women’s Commission out of the City of Syracuse Mayor’s Office, meeting with high-achieving middle-school girls. She is also on the board of trustees at the Museum of Science and Technology (MOST).
“Whether I like it or not, I’m one of only a few women of color in this position,” she says. “Addressing these larger issues of access to education and career exploration are just as important as the astrophysical work that I do.”

Learn more:
http://news.syr.edu/getting-to-know-astrophysicist-jedidah-isler-74966/
http://www.nature.com/naturejobs/science/articles/10.1038/nj7480-471a
http://www.npr.org/blogs/codeswitch/2013/12/17/251957062/a-graduate-program-works-to-diversify-the-science-world
https://twitter.com/JedidahIslerPhD

!!!!!!

BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOST YES DAMMIT!

Damn this is amazing!

wifigirl2080:

dynastylnoire:

ananicola:

securelyinsecure:

Meet Jedidah Isler

She is the first black woman to earn a PhD in astronomy from Yale University.

As much as she loves astrophysics, Isler is very aware of the barriers that still remain for young women of color going into science. “It’s unfortunately an as-yet-unresolved part of the experience,” she says. She works to lower those barriers, and also to improve the atmosphere for women of color once they become scientists, noting that “they often face unique barriers as a result of their position at the intersection of race and gender, not to mention class, socioeconomic status and potentially a number of other identities.”

While Isler recounts instances of overt racial and gender discrimination that are jaw-dropping, she says more subtle things happen more often. Isler works with the American Astronomical Society’s commission on the status of minorities in astronomy.

She also believes that while things will improve as more women of color enter the sciences, institutions must lead the way toward creating positive environments for diverse student populations. That is why she is active in directly engaging young women of color: for example participating in a career exploration panel on behalf of the Women’s Commission out of the City of Syracuse Mayor’s Office, meeting with high-achieving middle-school girls. She is also on the board of trustees at the Museum of Science and Technology (MOST).

“Whether I like it or not, I’m one of only a few women of color in this position,” she says. “Addressing these larger issues of access to education and career exploration are just as important as the astrophysical work that I do.”

Learn more:

!!!!!!

BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOST YES DAMMIT!

Damn this is amazing!

elenamorelli:

{ midsummer starry nights }
elenamorelli:

{ midsummer starry nights }
elenamorelli:

{ midsummer starry nights }
elenamorelli:

{ midsummer starry nights }
elenamorelli:

{ midsummer starry nights }

elenamorelli:

{ midsummer starry nights }

icanvassinheels:

Cosmospolitan… seems a bit more appropriate. And appealing.

wtf-fun-factss:

Why gamers are the smartest -  WTF fun facts

wtf-fun-factss:

Why gamers are the smartest -  WTF fun facts

(Source: shouldn-t)

fantasticfaces:

sixpenceee:

Underside of old frying pans by Christopher Jonassen

What

texas-red-dirt-sunset:

introbulus:

one-hamburger:

dicksp8jr:

fionaaelizabeth:

If corals get stressed they die, so if I was coral I would be dead 

what do coral even get stressed about

Current events

I sea.

guys, i work at an aquarium and my coworkers and i have literally laughed at this for three days straight. everytime we pass each other we whisper “current events” and crack up. our customers think we are nuts.

(Source: fionaelizabeth)

yogitheshooter:

Change is the natural course of life

(Source: uvmsemba)

"Here is a new spiritual practice for you: don’t take your thoughts so seriously."
Eckhart Tolle (via fourteendrawings)

(Source: )

medievalpoc:

medievalpoc:

sourcedumal:

medievalpoc:

loverandsynner submitted to medievalpoc:

this was taken at the Museum of London, Docklands - it has a large section about London’s role in slavery, and how slavery contributed to modern racism. 

I think that a lot of museums are finally starting to try and take a more proactive stance on how they present their exhibits and information about them.

For more on this kind of arrangement, I high recommend taking a look at these submissions from xanthy-m on the Swedish Historical Museum:

image

image

Oh what was that about black ppl in England not being present?

Since BEFORE THE 1500s?

MEANING DURING THE MEDIEVAL PERIOD

So yall “historically accurate” fuckers can be quiet

image

[source: Egerton Genesis Picture Book, England c. 1375]

For those who’ve asked: the portraits in the museum placard above are 1. Olaudah Equiano, a British abolitionist and 2. George Augustus Polgreen Bridgetower, a musical prodigy.

  1. Camera: Sony Ericsson R800i
  2. Exposure: 1/8th
  3. Focal Length: 3mm

teachnologies:

Said No Teacher. Ever.

(Source: youtube.com)

clavisa:

jaybushman:

Public Service Announcement.

There’s a ton of this kind of blather in Los Angeles. Knock it off, people.

"There’s no provision in quantum mechanics that gives the cat a better chance of survival if the person opening the box really, really, really wants it to stay alive. "

"

The basics are that for every one female-speaking character in family-rated films (G, PG and PG-13), there are roughly three male characters; that crowd and group scenes in these films — live-action and animated — contain only 17 percent female characters; and that the ratio of male-female characters has been exactly the same since 1946. Throw in the hypersexualization of many of the female characters that are there, even in G-rated movies, and their lack of occupations and aspirations and you get the picture.

It wasn’t the lack of female lead characters that first struck me about family films. We all know that’s been the case for ages, and we love when movies like The Hunger Games: Catching Fire and Frozen hit it big. It was the dearth of female characters in the worlds of the stories — the fact that the fictitious villages and jungles and kingdoms and interplanetary civilizations were nearly bereft of female population — that hit me over the head. This being the case, we are in effect enculturating kids from the very beginning to see women and girls as not taking up half of the space. Couldn’t it be that the percentage of women in leadership positions in many areas of society — Congress, law partners, Fortune 500 board members, military officers, tenured professors and many more — stall out at around 17 percent because that’s the ratio we’ve come to see as the norm?

OK, now for the fun part: It’s easy, fast and fun to add female characters, in two simple steps. And I want to be clear I’m not talking about creating more movies with a female lead. If you do, God bless and thank you. Please consider me for that role.

Step 1: Go through the projects you’re already working on and change a bunch of the characters’ first names to women’s names. With one stroke you’ve created some colorful unstereotypical female characters that might turn out to be even more interesting now that they’ve had a gender switch. What if the plumber or pilot or construction foreman is a woman? What if the taxi driver or the scheming politician is a woman? What if both police officers that arrive on the scene are women — and it’s not a big deal?

Step 2: When describing a crowd scene, write in the script, “A crowd gathers, which is half female.” That may seem weird, but I promise you, somehow or other on the set that day the crowd will turn out to be 17 percent female otherwise. Maybe first ADs think women don’t gather, I don’t know.

And there you have it. You have just quickly and easily boosted the female presence in your project without changing a line of dialogue.

Yes, we can and will work to tell more women’s stories, listen to more women’s voices and write richer female characters and to fix the 5-to-1 ratio of men/women behind the camera. But consider this: In all of the sectors of society that still have a huge gender disparity, how long will it take to correct that? You can’t snap your fingers and suddenly half of Congress is women. But there’s one category where the underrepresentation of women can be fixed tomorrow: onscreen. In the time it takes to make a movie or create a television show, we can change what the future looks like.

There are woefully few women CEOs in the world, but there can be lots of them in films. We haven’t had a woman president yet, but we have on TV. (Full disclosure: One of them was me.) How can we fix the problem of corporate boards being so unequal without quotas? Well, they can be half women instantly, onscreen. How do we encourage a lot more girls to pursue science, technology and engineering careers? By casting droves of women in STEM jobs today in movies and on TV. Hey, it would take me many years to become a real nuclear physicist, but I can play one tomorrow.

Here’s what I always say: If they can see it, they can be it.

"
— Geena Davis on gender equality in film and television [x] (via wesleywalesandersons)