"

This reality is a bit harder to swallow: There are more white people in the US and Canada because the US and Canada were established using the systematic genocide of Native peoples, the theft of Native lands, and the labour of enslaved peoples in the past and immigrant peoples currently who were and are never meant to stay or survive.

And now you’re uncomfortable. Good.

When you accept and acknowledge that census figures reflect a long history of marginalization, it is preposterous to use these same figures as the benchmark to which you measure the inclusion of marginalized people.

"
— There’s a great piece in the Toast about representation and diversity (‘Proportional Representation’ Has No Place In Diversity Discussions by Léonicka Valcius) today. (via whineandbeer)

laura-thesedays:

landlocked-selkie:

kateordie:

alaskaskellum:

Something for my feminist theory class.

I’d love to see the reactions to this from a crowd. I can kind of imagine a quiet, solemn understanding from the ladies and a lot of confused questions from the guys… If my memory of art school serves me.

In 9th grade English we read Laurie Halse Anderson’s “Speak”. For those of you who haven’t read it, the author makes it abundantly clear that the teenage protagonist, Melinda, was raped, before the protagonist actually says it.

Our English teacher asked the boys in the class what happened to Mel. They came up with the most ridiculous answers. Every girl in the class just knew.

This just goes to show…

Not all men menace women, but yes all women have felt menaced by a man.

Every girl understands this because every girl knows the fear implicit in this image.

lookingforsydney:

feminishblog:

sugaredvenom:

mattreadsthings:


fatswaggin
:

Found this in a bathroom at my college. A lot of guys had eating disorders in football and wrestling at my school and even in the rec league. I remember guys taking laxatives before weigh ins even.

Male eating disorder awareness ~

Wrestling is infamous for that kind of shit. It’s one of the reasons my brother left the sport— his coaches were ENCOURAGING him to engage in unsafe behavior.

I’ve seen a lot of it the other way round, especially in rugby, I know several men who were encouraged to go to unsafe measures to gain weight.

Yes. ^^^ The masculinization of eating disorders. I knew some wrestling guys back in high school - it became this competition as to who could lose then keep of their weight the best. The guys would have competitions to see who could go the longest without eating, and if you lost, of course, you were a “pussy”

Thankfully a suspension went on while they reviewed these practices that were of course encouraged by the coaches.

Almost every wrestler I’ve met has engaged in ridiculously dangerous behavior at the encouragement of their coaches and even their own parents. My cousin would do unsafe amounts of exercise and then barely eat or only eat baby food as he dropped weight at alarming rates. But no one ever acknowledges these behaviors as being dangerous because it’s “for a sport”. We need to put an end to this.

holtthink:

Not sure if this got past me or not, but I don’t recall posting about it. From 2013: An entire issue of Scientific American dedicated to digital learning. A lot of it is MOOC based, bt there are some interesting articles within the special edition.

Here are the articles in the special edition:

Big Data Makes Big Inroads into Schools

Introduction to a special report on the ways technology is remaking every aspect of education—bringing top-notch courses to the world’s poorest citizens and reshaping the way all students learn

Free Online Courses Bring “Magic” to Rwanda

An inside look at a daring global experiment: using freely available online courses to bring top-tier instruction to the neediest parts of the planet

How to Make Online Courses Massively Personal

How thousands of online students can get the effect of one-on-one tutoring

Take a Data-Driven Geography Lesson

Part exam, part tutorial, LearnSmart’s state-capitals quiz continuously adjusts to your performance.

How Big Data Is Taking Teachers Out of the Lecturing Business

Schools and universities are embracing technology that tailors content to students’ abilities and takes teachers out of the lecturing business. But is it an improvement?

The Founder of Khan Academy on How to Blend the Virtual with the Physical

Technology can humanize the classroom

Diane Ravitch: 3 Dubious Uses of Technology in Schools

Technology can inspire creativity or dehumanize learning

How MOOCs Can Help India

Online courses may help alleviate faculty shortages and improve education

Online Courses Can Improve Life on Campus

The future of on-campus learning lies in the right combination of digital and traditional tools

Arne Duncan: How Technology Will Revolutionize Testing and Learning

Greater broadband access will bring the latest digital tools to more teachers and students

Students Say Online Courses Enrich On-Campus Learning

One in five science students surveyed by Nature and Scientific American has participated in a MOOC—and most would do so again

Click on the title above to go the article.

terezi-owns2:

THE LITTLE KID NEXT DOOR JSUT OPENED HIS WINDOW AND YELLED “WHAT IS 27 PLUS 4” AND I YELLED “IT’S 31” AND HE SAID “THANK YOU GOD LADY” IM LAUGIHNG

(Source: terezisprite2)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Ethereal forms shift and swirl in photographer Thomas Herbich’s series “Smoke”. The cigarette smoke in the images is a buoyant plume. As it rises, the smoke is sheared and shaped by its passage through the ambient air. What begins as a laminar plume is quickly disturbed, rolling up into vortices shaped like the scroll on the end of a violin. The vortices are a precursor to the turbulence that follows, mixing the smoke and ambient air so effectively that the smoke diffuses into invisibility. To see the full series, see Herbich’s website.  (Image credits: T. Herbich; via Colossal; submitted by @jchawner, @__pj, and Larry B)
P.S. - FYFD now has a page listing all entries by topic, which should make it easier for everyone to find specific topics of interest. Check it out!
fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Ethereal forms shift and swirl in photographer Thomas Herbich’s series “Smoke”. The cigarette smoke in the images is a buoyant plume. As it rises, the smoke is sheared and shaped by its passage through the ambient air. What begins as a laminar plume is quickly disturbed, rolling up into vortices shaped like the scroll on the end of a violin. The vortices are a precursor to the turbulence that follows, mixing the smoke and ambient air so effectively that the smoke diffuses into invisibility. To see the full series, see Herbich’s website.  (Image credits: T. Herbich; via Colossal; submitted by @jchawner, @__pj, and Larry B)
P.S. - FYFD now has a page listing all entries by topic, which should make it easier for everyone to find specific topics of interest. Check it out!
fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Ethereal forms shift and swirl in photographer Thomas Herbich’s series “Smoke”. The cigarette smoke in the images is a buoyant plume. As it rises, the smoke is sheared and shaped by its passage through the ambient air. What begins as a laminar plume is quickly disturbed, rolling up into vortices shaped like the scroll on the end of a violin. The vortices are a precursor to the turbulence that follows, mixing the smoke and ambient air so effectively that the smoke diffuses into invisibility. To see the full series, see Herbich’s website.  (Image credits: T. Herbich; via Colossal; submitted by @jchawner, @__pj, and Larry B)
P.S. - FYFD now has a page listing all entries by topic, which should make it easier for everyone to find specific topics of interest. Check it out!

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Ethereal forms shift and swirl in photographer Thomas Herbich’s series “Smoke”. The cigarette smoke in the images is a buoyant plume. As it rises, the smoke is sheared and shaped by its passage through the ambient air. What begins as a laminar plume is quickly disturbed, rolling up into vortices shaped like the scroll on the end of a violin. The vortices are a precursor to the turbulence that follows, mixing the smoke and ambient air so effectively that the smoke diffuses into invisibility. To see the full series, see Herbich’s website.  (Image credits: T. Herbich; via Colossal; submitted by @jchawner@__pj, and Larry B)

P.S. - FYFD now has a page listing all entries by topic, which should make it easier for everyone to find specific topics of interest. Check it out!

finding-fucken-nemo:

newyorksjojo:

spookingdemons:

fucknbosschick:

youdtearthiscanvasskinapart:

vitalemontea:

sketchlock:

thegrimmgrimm:

aburritoofsadness:

iamswagg007:

kgrossniklaus:

gentlemanbones:

I fucking hate game night with the engineering graduates

Don’t get me started on Poker Night with the math students. 

Monopoly with business majors is the fucking worst

Scrabble with english majors is a nightmare.

i can’t believe those weren’t puns

Don’t forget Pictionary with Art Students.

Words against humanity with sociologist and poli sci students is horrifying

PLAY CLUE WITH INVESTIGATIVE LAW MAJORS AND THEN COME TALK TO ME

BEST POST ON TUMBLR.

Operation with a surgeon…

On the other hand, Rock Band with the music majors is beautiful.

oh shit

(Source: the-thought-emporium-imperial)

pennyfornasa:

Does the “7 Minutes Of Terror” sound like a cheesy horror flick or a theme park ride to you? It’s not. That’s the phrase NASA used to describe the entry, descent and landing (also known as EDL) sequence of the Mars rover, Curiosity. Seven minutes is the time it took for Curiosity to go from the top of the Martian atmosphere to the surface of Mars. It was by far the most complicated and ambitious Mars landing ever attempted.It required a carefully orchestrated set of maneuvers that had to be controlled entirely by computer. Even the slightest error could mean disaster. The spacecraft began to decelerate as it entered the Martian atmosphere and was guided using small rockets, then at approximately 1,000 mph a supersonic parachute was deployed to further slow the descent allowing the heat shield to separate at around 370 mph. Curiosity then separated from its parachute and began its powered descent at 70 mph using retrorockets that slowed the rover and brought it close enough to the surface that it could be lowered to the ground via a sky crane. It was a daring feat of engineering that captivated the world had everyone holding their breath until they heard the words of the mission controller, “Touchdown confirmed. We’re safe on Mars!”Watch the “7 Minutes Of Terror” http://youtu.be/Ki_Af_o9Q9sDownload the full infographic here: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/infographics/infographic.view.php?id=10776Anyone else think the “7 Minutes Of Terror” would make an awesome theme park ride?
pennyfornasa:

Does the “7 Minutes Of Terror” sound like a cheesy horror flick or a theme park ride to you? It’s not. That’s the phrase NASA used to describe the entry, descent and landing (also known as EDL) sequence of the Mars rover, Curiosity. Seven minutes is the time it took for Curiosity to go from the top of the Martian atmosphere to the surface of Mars. It was by far the most complicated and ambitious Mars landing ever attempted.It required a carefully orchestrated set of maneuvers that had to be controlled entirely by computer. Even the slightest error could mean disaster. The spacecraft began to decelerate as it entered the Martian atmosphere and was guided using small rockets, then at approximately 1,000 mph a supersonic parachute was deployed to further slow the descent allowing the heat shield to separate at around 370 mph. Curiosity then separated from its parachute and began its powered descent at 70 mph using retrorockets that slowed the rover and brought it close enough to the surface that it could be lowered to the ground via a sky crane. It was a daring feat of engineering that captivated the world had everyone holding their breath until they heard the words of the mission controller, “Touchdown confirmed. We’re safe on Mars!”Watch the “7 Minutes Of Terror” http://youtu.be/Ki_Af_o9Q9sDownload the full infographic here: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/infographics/infographic.view.php?id=10776Anyone else think the “7 Minutes Of Terror” would make an awesome theme park ride?
pennyfornasa:

Does the “7 Minutes Of Terror” sound like a cheesy horror flick or a theme park ride to you? It’s not. That’s the phrase NASA used to describe the entry, descent and landing (also known as EDL) sequence of the Mars rover, Curiosity. Seven minutes is the time it took for Curiosity to go from the top of the Martian atmosphere to the surface of Mars. It was by far the most complicated and ambitious Mars landing ever attempted.It required a carefully orchestrated set of maneuvers that had to be controlled entirely by computer. Even the slightest error could mean disaster. The spacecraft began to decelerate as it entered the Martian atmosphere and was guided using small rockets, then at approximately 1,000 mph a supersonic parachute was deployed to further slow the descent allowing the heat shield to separate at around 370 mph. Curiosity then separated from its parachute and began its powered descent at 70 mph using retrorockets that slowed the rover and brought it close enough to the surface that it could be lowered to the ground via a sky crane. It was a daring feat of engineering that captivated the world had everyone holding their breath until they heard the words of the mission controller, “Touchdown confirmed. We’re safe on Mars!”Watch the “7 Minutes Of Terror” http://youtu.be/Ki_Af_o9Q9sDownload the full infographic here: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/infographics/infographic.view.php?id=10776Anyone else think the “7 Minutes Of Terror” would make an awesome theme park ride?
pennyfornasa:

Does the “7 Minutes Of Terror” sound like a cheesy horror flick or a theme park ride to you? It’s not. That’s the phrase NASA used to describe the entry, descent and landing (also known as EDL) sequence of the Mars rover, Curiosity. Seven minutes is the time it took for Curiosity to go from the top of the Martian atmosphere to the surface of Mars. It was by far the most complicated and ambitious Mars landing ever attempted.It required a carefully orchestrated set of maneuvers that had to be controlled entirely by computer. Even the slightest error could mean disaster. The spacecraft began to decelerate as it entered the Martian atmosphere and was guided using small rockets, then at approximately 1,000 mph a supersonic parachute was deployed to further slow the descent allowing the heat shield to separate at around 370 mph. Curiosity then separated from its parachute and began its powered descent at 70 mph using retrorockets that slowed the rover and brought it close enough to the surface that it could be lowered to the ground via a sky crane. It was a daring feat of engineering that captivated the world had everyone holding their breath until they heard the words of the mission controller, “Touchdown confirmed. We’re safe on Mars!”Watch the “7 Minutes Of Terror” http://youtu.be/Ki_Af_o9Q9sDownload the full infographic here: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/infographics/infographic.view.php?id=10776Anyone else think the “7 Minutes Of Terror” would make an awesome theme park ride?
pennyfornasa:

Does the “7 Minutes Of Terror” sound like a cheesy horror flick or a theme park ride to you? It’s not. That’s the phrase NASA used to describe the entry, descent and landing (also known as EDL) sequence of the Mars rover, Curiosity. Seven minutes is the time it took for Curiosity to go from the top of the Martian atmosphere to the surface of Mars. It was by far the most complicated and ambitious Mars landing ever attempted.It required a carefully orchestrated set of maneuvers that had to be controlled entirely by computer. Even the slightest error could mean disaster. The spacecraft began to decelerate as it entered the Martian atmosphere and was guided using small rockets, then at approximately 1,000 mph a supersonic parachute was deployed to further slow the descent allowing the heat shield to separate at around 370 mph. Curiosity then separated from its parachute and began its powered descent at 70 mph using retrorockets that slowed the rover and brought it close enough to the surface that it could be lowered to the ground via a sky crane. It was a daring feat of engineering that captivated the world had everyone holding their breath until they heard the words of the mission controller, “Touchdown confirmed. We’re safe on Mars!”Watch the “7 Minutes Of Terror” http://youtu.be/Ki_Af_o9Q9sDownload the full infographic here: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/infographics/infographic.view.php?id=10776Anyone else think the “7 Minutes Of Terror” would make an awesome theme park ride?

pennyfornasa:

Does the “7 Minutes Of Terror” sound like a cheesy horror flick or a theme park ride to you? It’s not. That’s the phrase NASA used to describe the entry, descent and landing (also known as EDL) sequence of the Mars rover, Curiosity. Seven minutes is the time it took for Curiosity to go from the top of the Martian atmosphere to the surface of Mars. It was by far the most complicated and ambitious Mars landing ever attempted.

It required a carefully orchestrated set of maneuvers that had to be controlled entirely by computer. Even the slightest error could mean disaster. The spacecraft began to decelerate as it entered the Martian atmosphere and was guided using small rockets, then at approximately 1,000 mph a supersonic parachute was deployed to further slow the descent allowing the heat shield to separate at around 370 mph. Curiosity then separated from its parachute and began its powered descent at 70 mph using retrorockets that slowed the rover and brought it close enough to the surface that it could be lowered to the ground via a sky crane. It was a daring feat of engineering that captivated the world had everyone holding their breath until they heard the words of the mission controller, “Touchdown confirmed. We’re safe on Mars!”

Watch the “7 Minutes Of Terror” http://youtu.be/Ki_Af_o9Q9s

Download the full infographic here: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/infographics/infographic.view.php?id=10776

Anyone else think the “7 Minutes Of Terror” would make an awesome theme park ride?

ucresearch:

Einstein’s Brain   (…and the neuroscientist who studied it)
Marian Diamond began her graduate work in 1948 and was the first female student in the department of anatomy at UC Berkeley.  The first thing she was asked to do when she got there was sew a cover for a large magnifying machine (?!?!?!?!).

"They didn’t know what to do with me because they weren’t used to having a woman. They thought I was there to get a husband. I was there to learn."

Such challenges were not uncommon. Years later she requested tissue samples of Albert Einstein’s brain from a pathologist in Missouri. He didn’t trust her.

"He wasn’t sure that I was a scientist. This is one thing that you have to face being a woman.  He didn’t think that I should be the one to be looking at Einstein’s brain."

Marian persisted for three years, calling him once every six months, and received four blocks of the physicist’s brain tissue (about the size of a sugar cube).  
Her research found that Einstein had twice as many glial cells as normal males — the discovery caused an international sensation as well as scientific criticism.  
What are glial cells?  Previously, scientists believe that neurons were responsible for thinking and glial cells were support cells in the brain.  Now Researchers believe the glial cells play a critical role in brain development, learning, memory, aging and disease.
Watch her popular course on Human Anatomy → ucresearch:

Einstein’s Brain   (…and the neuroscientist who studied it)
Marian Diamond began her graduate work in 1948 and was the first female student in the department of anatomy at UC Berkeley.  The first thing she was asked to do when she got there was sew a cover for a large magnifying machine (?!?!?!?!).

"They didn’t know what to do with me because they weren’t used to having a woman. They thought I was there to get a husband. I was there to learn."

Such challenges were not uncommon. Years later she requested tissue samples of Albert Einstein’s brain from a pathologist in Missouri. He didn’t trust her.

"He wasn’t sure that I was a scientist. This is one thing that you have to face being a woman.  He didn’t think that I should be the one to be looking at Einstein’s brain."

Marian persisted for three years, calling him once every six months, and received four blocks of the physicist’s brain tissue (about the size of a sugar cube).  
Her research found that Einstein had twice as many glial cells as normal males — the discovery caused an international sensation as well as scientific criticism.  
What are glial cells?  Previously, scientists believe that neurons were responsible for thinking and glial cells were support cells in the brain.  Now Researchers believe the glial cells play a critical role in brain development, learning, memory, aging and disease.
Watch her popular course on Human Anatomy →

ucresearch:

Einstein’s Brain   (…and the neuroscientist who studied it)


Marian Diamond began her graduate work in 1948 and was the first female student in the department of anatomy at UC Berkeley.  The first thing she was asked to do when she got there was sew a cover for a large magnifying machine (?!?!?!?!).

"They didn’t know what to do with me because they weren’t used to having a woman. They thought I was there to get a husband. I was there to learn."

Such challenges were not uncommon. Years later she requested tissue samples of Albert Einstein’s brain from a pathologist in Missouri. He didn’t trust her.

"He wasn’t sure that I was a scientist. This is one thing that you have to face being a woman.  He didn’t think that I should be the one to be looking at Einstein’s brain."

Marian persisted for three years, calling him once every six months, and received four blocks of the physicist’s brain tissue (about the size of a sugar cube).  

Her research found that Einstein had twice as many glial cells as normal males — the discovery caused an international sensation as well as scientific criticism.  

What are glial cells?  Previously, scientists believe that neurons were responsible for thinking and glial cells were support cells in the brain.  Now Researchers believe the glial cells play a critical role in brain development, learning, memory, aging and disease.

Watch her popular course on Human Anatomy

wifigirl2080:

dynastylnoire:

ananicola:

securelyinsecure:

Meet Jedidah Isler
She is the first black woman to earn a PhD in astronomy from Yale University.

As much as she loves astrophysics, Isler is very aware of the barriers that still remain for young women of color going into science. “It’s unfortunately an as-yet-unresolved part of the experience,” she says. She works to lower those barriers, and also to improve the atmosphere for women of color once they become scientists, noting that “they often face unique barriers as a result of their position at the intersection of race and gender, not to mention class, socioeconomic status and potentially a number of other identities.”
While Isler recounts instances of overt racial and gender discrimination that are jaw-dropping, she says more subtle things happen more often. Isler works with the American Astronomical Society’s commission on the status of minorities in astronomy.
She also believes that while things will improve as more women of color enter the sciences, institutions must lead the way toward creating positive environments for diverse student populations. That is why she is active in directly engaging young women of color: for example participating in a career exploration panel on behalf of the Women’s Commission out of the City of Syracuse Mayor’s Office, meeting with high-achieving middle-school girls. She is also on the board of trustees at the Museum of Science and Technology (MOST).
“Whether I like it or not, I’m one of only a few women of color in this position,” she says. “Addressing these larger issues of access to education and career exploration are just as important as the astrophysical work that I do.”

Learn more:
http://news.syr.edu/getting-to-know-astrophysicist-jedidah-isler-74966/
http://www.nature.com/naturejobs/science/articles/10.1038/nj7480-471a
http://www.npr.org/blogs/codeswitch/2013/12/17/251957062/a-graduate-program-works-to-diversify-the-science-world
https://twitter.com/JedidahIslerPhD

!!!!!!

BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOST YES DAMMIT!

Damn this is amazing!
wifigirl2080:

dynastylnoire:

ananicola:

securelyinsecure:

Meet Jedidah Isler
She is the first black woman to earn a PhD in astronomy from Yale University.

As much as she loves astrophysics, Isler is very aware of the barriers that still remain for young women of color going into science. “It’s unfortunately an as-yet-unresolved part of the experience,” she says. She works to lower those barriers, and also to improve the atmosphere for women of color once they become scientists, noting that “they often face unique barriers as a result of their position at the intersection of race and gender, not to mention class, socioeconomic status and potentially a number of other identities.”
While Isler recounts instances of overt racial and gender discrimination that are jaw-dropping, she says more subtle things happen more often. Isler works with the American Astronomical Society’s commission on the status of minorities in astronomy.
She also believes that while things will improve as more women of color enter the sciences, institutions must lead the way toward creating positive environments for diverse student populations. That is why she is active in directly engaging young women of color: for example participating in a career exploration panel on behalf of the Women’s Commission out of the City of Syracuse Mayor’s Office, meeting with high-achieving middle-school girls. She is also on the board of trustees at the Museum of Science and Technology (MOST).
“Whether I like it or not, I’m one of only a few women of color in this position,” she says. “Addressing these larger issues of access to education and career exploration are just as important as the astrophysical work that I do.”

Learn more:
http://news.syr.edu/getting-to-know-astrophysicist-jedidah-isler-74966/
http://www.nature.com/naturejobs/science/articles/10.1038/nj7480-471a
http://www.npr.org/blogs/codeswitch/2013/12/17/251957062/a-graduate-program-works-to-diversify-the-science-world
https://twitter.com/JedidahIslerPhD

!!!!!!

BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOST YES DAMMIT!

Damn this is amazing!
wifigirl2080:

dynastylnoire:

ananicola:

securelyinsecure:

Meet Jedidah Isler
She is the first black woman to earn a PhD in astronomy from Yale University.

As much as she loves astrophysics, Isler is very aware of the barriers that still remain for young women of color going into science. “It’s unfortunately an as-yet-unresolved part of the experience,” she says. She works to lower those barriers, and also to improve the atmosphere for women of color once they become scientists, noting that “they often face unique barriers as a result of their position at the intersection of race and gender, not to mention class, socioeconomic status and potentially a number of other identities.”
While Isler recounts instances of overt racial and gender discrimination that are jaw-dropping, she says more subtle things happen more often. Isler works with the American Astronomical Society’s commission on the status of minorities in astronomy.
She also believes that while things will improve as more women of color enter the sciences, institutions must lead the way toward creating positive environments for diverse student populations. That is why she is active in directly engaging young women of color: for example participating in a career exploration panel on behalf of the Women’s Commission out of the City of Syracuse Mayor’s Office, meeting with high-achieving middle-school girls. She is also on the board of trustees at the Museum of Science and Technology (MOST).
“Whether I like it or not, I’m one of only a few women of color in this position,” she says. “Addressing these larger issues of access to education and career exploration are just as important as the astrophysical work that I do.”

Learn more:
http://news.syr.edu/getting-to-know-astrophysicist-jedidah-isler-74966/
http://www.nature.com/naturejobs/science/articles/10.1038/nj7480-471a
http://www.npr.org/blogs/codeswitch/2013/12/17/251957062/a-graduate-program-works-to-diversify-the-science-world
https://twitter.com/JedidahIslerPhD

!!!!!!

BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOST YES DAMMIT!

Damn this is amazing!
wifigirl2080:

dynastylnoire:

ananicola:

securelyinsecure:

Meet Jedidah Isler
She is the first black woman to earn a PhD in astronomy from Yale University.

As much as she loves astrophysics, Isler is very aware of the barriers that still remain for young women of color going into science. “It’s unfortunately an as-yet-unresolved part of the experience,” she says. She works to lower those barriers, and also to improve the atmosphere for women of color once they become scientists, noting that “they often face unique barriers as a result of their position at the intersection of race and gender, not to mention class, socioeconomic status and potentially a number of other identities.”
While Isler recounts instances of overt racial and gender discrimination that are jaw-dropping, she says more subtle things happen more often. Isler works with the American Astronomical Society’s commission on the status of minorities in astronomy.
She also believes that while things will improve as more women of color enter the sciences, institutions must lead the way toward creating positive environments for diverse student populations. That is why she is active in directly engaging young women of color: for example participating in a career exploration panel on behalf of the Women’s Commission out of the City of Syracuse Mayor’s Office, meeting with high-achieving middle-school girls. She is also on the board of trustees at the Museum of Science and Technology (MOST).
“Whether I like it or not, I’m one of only a few women of color in this position,” she says. “Addressing these larger issues of access to education and career exploration are just as important as the astrophysical work that I do.”

Learn more:
http://news.syr.edu/getting-to-know-astrophysicist-jedidah-isler-74966/
http://www.nature.com/naturejobs/science/articles/10.1038/nj7480-471a
http://www.npr.org/blogs/codeswitch/2013/12/17/251957062/a-graduate-program-works-to-diversify-the-science-world
https://twitter.com/JedidahIslerPhD

!!!!!!

BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOST YES DAMMIT!

Damn this is amazing!

wifigirl2080:

dynastylnoire:

ananicola:

securelyinsecure:

Meet Jedidah Isler

She is the first black woman to earn a PhD in astronomy from Yale University.

As much as she loves astrophysics, Isler is very aware of the barriers that still remain for young women of color going into science. “It’s unfortunately an as-yet-unresolved part of the experience,” she says. She works to lower those barriers, and also to improve the atmosphere for women of color once they become scientists, noting that “they often face unique barriers as a result of their position at the intersection of race and gender, not to mention class, socioeconomic status and potentially a number of other identities.”

While Isler recounts instances of overt racial and gender discrimination that are jaw-dropping, she says more subtle things happen more often. Isler works with the American Astronomical Society’s commission on the status of minorities in astronomy.

She also believes that while things will improve as more women of color enter the sciences, institutions must lead the way toward creating positive environments for diverse student populations. That is why she is active in directly engaging young women of color: for example participating in a career exploration panel on behalf of the Women’s Commission out of the City of Syracuse Mayor’s Office, meeting with high-achieving middle-school girls. She is also on the board of trustees at the Museum of Science and Technology (MOST).

“Whether I like it or not, I’m one of only a few women of color in this position,” she says. “Addressing these larger issues of access to education and career exploration are just as important as the astrophysical work that I do.”

Learn more:

!!!!!!

BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOST YES DAMMIT!

Damn this is amazing!

elenamorelli:

{ midsummer starry nights }
elenamorelli:

{ midsummer starry nights }
elenamorelli:

{ midsummer starry nights }
elenamorelli:

{ midsummer starry nights }
elenamorelli:

{ midsummer starry nights }

elenamorelli:

{ midsummer starry nights }

icanvassinheels:

Cosmospolitan… seems a bit more appropriate. And appealing.

wtf-fun-factss:

Why gamers are the smartest -  WTF fun facts

wtf-fun-factss:

Why gamers are the smartest -  WTF fun facts

(Source: shouldn-t)

fantasticfaces:

sixpenceee:

Underside of old frying pans by Christopher Jonassen

What